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Deletion means that the article has been nominated to be removed from Wikipedia because it violates one of Wikipedia's guidelines. There are a few different versions of deletion, but here are the most common:

  1. Speedy deletion. This is when an article violates a guideline and falls under one of the acceptable reasons for deletion listed at the speedy deletion page. The most common reasons are usually copyright violations, overly promotional content, and articles about people, organizations, or music albums that do not have a good claim of notability.

    The best way to oppose a speedy deletion is to try to resolve the issues in the nomination. If the article doesn't make a good assertion of notability, try to find independent, reliable sources to show where the topic has received coverage and (if possible) expand the article with more content. Make sure that you write the article in a neutral fashion, however, so that you don't make the article seem promotional by playing up certain aspects or using terms like "passion for". If the article seems promotional, try going through and removing anything that makes the article seem to be an advertisement or any promotional buzzwords. You may want to ask the nominating editor if they can give any advice on what should be changed. Finally, if the article contains copyright violations the best thing to do would be to immediately re-write the article to remove the copyrighted content.

  2. Proposed deletion (PROD). This is a slower form of deletion as the deletion proposal gives editors seven days to contest the deletion and/or resolve any issues before it is deleted. While you can remove a PROD notice, you should only do so if you can resolve the article's issues, as the nominating editor may choose to follow up by nominating for deletion through the Articles for Deletion process. If you remove the PROD it's a good idea to give an explanation for doing this on the article's talk page, especially if you feel that the nomination was without merit. (Even in cases where you believe the nominator was wrong, it's always a good idea to check over the article's content and sourcing!) PROD is the only time that you can remove a deletion template from an article you created.

  3. Articles for Deletion (AfD). An article can be nominated for AfD if the nominating editor believes that it violates guidelines and that it would not qualify for a speedy deletion. The editor may also believe that others may contest the nomination (making PROD an unsuitable solution) and that the article should be discussed by several people over a period of several days. AfDs typically run for one week and can be started for many reasons, the most common being notability. As with the other forms of deletion, the best way to save the article is to try to resolve any of the issues that the nominator feels qualifies it for deletion.

When faced with article deletion, always try to assume good faith from the other editor and if possible, seek feedback over the deletion. Don't be afraid to ask that editor to elaborate on their reasons. Also feel free to ask your Content Expert for any advice about what you can do to save the article - they're here to help you as much as possible! If the article does end up getting deleted you can always ask if the deleting administrator can send you a copy of the page via e-mail (you need to have your email enabled) to pass along to your educator. If you're interested in trying to work on the page and it doesn't have any major issues like copyright violations, you can also ask to have a copy of the article sent to your sandbox or userspace. Only do this if you're truly interested in working on the page, though!

This is why it's a good idea to work on articles in your sandbox before moving them live and to refer to your training modules and Wiki Education's Editing Wikipedia brochure before editing, to make sure that your article is as complete as possible before making it live.

Deletion means that the article has been nominated to be removed from Wikipedia because it violates one of Wikipedia's guidelines. There are a few different versions of deletion, but here are the most common:

  1. Speedy deletion. This is when an article violates a guideline and falls under one of the acceptable reasons for deletion listed at the speedy deletion page. The most common reasons are usually copyright violations, overly promotional content, and articles about people, organizations, or music albums that do not have a good claim of notability.

    The best way to oppose a speedy deletion is to try to resolve the issues in the nomination. If the article doesn't make a good assertion of notability, try to find independent, reliable sources to show where the topic has received coverage and (if possible) expand the article with more content. Make sure that you write the article in a neutral fashion, however, so that you don't make the article seem promotional by playing up certain aspects or using terms like "passion for". If the article seems promotional, try going through and removing anything that makes the article seem to be an advertisement or any promotional buzzwords. You may want to ask the nominating editor if they can give any advice on what should be changed. Finally, if the article contains copyright violations the best thing to do would be to immediately re-write the article to remove the copyrighted content.

  2. Proposed deletion (PROD). This is a slower form of deletion as the deletion proposal gives editors seven days to contest the deletion and/or resolve any issues before it is deleted. While you can remove a PROD notice, you should only do so if you can resolve the article's issues, as the nominating editor may choose to follow up by nominating for deletion through the Articles for Deletion process. If you remove the PROD it's a good idea to give an explanation for doing this on the article's talk page, especially if you feel that the nomination was without merit. (Even in cases where you believe the nominator was wrong, it's always a good idea to check over the article's content and sourcing!) PROD is the only time that you can remove a deletion template from an article you created.

  3. Articles for Deletion (AfD). An article can be nominated for AfD if the nominating editor believes that it violates guidelines and that it would not qualify for a speedy deletion. The editor may also believe that others may contest the nomination (making PROD an unsuitable solution) and that the article should be discussed by several people over a period of several days. AfDs typically run for one week and can be started for many reasons, the most common being notability. As with the other forms of deletion, the best way to save the article is to try to resolve any of the issues that the nominator feels qualifies it for deletion.

When faced with article deletion, always try to assume good faith from the other editor and if possible, seek feedback over the deletion. Don't be afraid to ask that editor to elaborate on their reasons. Also feel free to ask your Content Expert for any advice about what you can do to save the article - they're here to help you as much as possible! If the article does end up getting deleted you can always ask if the deleting administrator can send you a copy of the page via e-mail (you need to have your email enabled) to pass along to your educator. If you're interested in trying to work on the page and it doesn't have any major issues like copyright violations, you can also ask to have a copy of the article sent to your sandbox or userspace. Only do this if you're truly interested in working on the page, though!

This is why it's a good idea to work on articles in your sandbox before moving them live and to refer to your training modules and Wiki Education's Editing Wikipedia brochure before editing, to make sure that your article is as complete as possible before making it live.

Deletion means that the article has been nominated to be removed from Wikipedia because it violates one of Wikipedia's guidelines. There are a few different versions Generally, the best way to handle a deletion nomination is to address what the nominating editor found problematic about your work. Try to assume good faith, and don't be afraid to ask the editor about their reasons. You can also ask your Wikipedia Expert for advice.

The most common types of deletion, but here and how to deal with them, are the most common:as follows:

  1. Speedy deletion.deletion
    This is when an article violates a guideline and falls under one of the acceptable reasons for deletion listed at on the speedy deletion page. The most common reasons are usually copyright violations, overly promotional content, and articles about people, organizations, or music albums that do not have a good claim of notability. violations (and how to fix them) are:

    The best way to oppose a speedy deletion is to try to resolve the issues in the nomination. If the article doesn't make a good assertion of notability, try

    • Notability: Try to find independent, reliable sources to show where the topic has received coverage and (if possible) expand the article with more content. content.
    • Promotional: Make sure that you write the article in a neutral fashion, however, so that you don't make fashion. Go back through your work and remove promotional buzzwords or anything that makes the article seem promotional by playing up certain aspects or using terms like "passion for". If the article seems promotional, try going through and removing anything that makes the article seem to be an advertisement or any promotional buzzwords. You may want to ask the nominating editor if they can give any advice on what should be changed. Finally, if the article contains copyright violations the advertisement.
    • Copyright violations: The best thing to do would be to immediately re-write the article to remove the copyrighted content.

    • content.

    Proposed deletion (PROD).(PROD)
    This is a slower form of deletion as the deletion proposal gives editors seven days to contest the deletion and/or or resolve any issues before it is deleted. While you can remove a PROD notice, you should only do so if you can resolve the article's issues, as the nominating editor may choose to follow up by nominating for deletion through the Articles for Deletion process. If you remove the PROD it's a good idea to give an explanation for doing this issues or explain yourself on the article's talk page, especially if you feel that the nomination was without merit. (Even page. Even in cases where you believe the nominator was wrong, it's always a good idea to check over the article's content and sourcing!) PROD is the only time that you can remove a deletion template from an article you created. sourcing!

  2. Articles for Deletion (AfD).(AfD)
    An article can be nominated for AfD if the nominating editor believes that it violates guidelines and guidelines, but that it would not qualify for a speedy deletion. The editor may also believe that others may will contest the nomination (making PROD an unsuitable solution) and that the article should be discussed by several people over a period of several days. AfDs typically run for one week and can be started for many reasons, the most common being notability. As with the other forms of deletion, the best way to save the article is to try week. You have that time to resolve any of the issues that the nominator feels qualifies it your work for deletion. deletion.

When faced with article deletion, always try to assume good faith from the other editor and if possible, seek feedback over the deletion. Don't be afraid to ask that editor to elaborate on their reasons. Also feel free to ask your Content Expert for any advice about what you can do to save the article - they're here to help you as much as possible! If your article is deleted
If the article does end up getting deleted you can always ask if the deleting administrator can to send you a copy of the page via e-mail (you need to have your email enabled) to pass along to your educator. If you're interested in trying to work on the page and it doesn't have any major issues like copyright violations, you can also ask to have a copy of the article sent to your sandbox or userspace. Only do this if you're truly interested in working on the page, though!

This is why it's a good idea to work on articles in your sandbox before moving them live and to refer to your training modules and Wiki Education's the Editing Wikipedia brochure before editing, to make sure that your article is as complete as possible before making it live.brochure.