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With so many articles on Wikipedia, it's easy to get overwhelmed and panic about picking out an article! One of the best ways to solve the issue of an overabundance of topics is to consider the following questions:

  • Is my class focusing on a specific topic?
  • What are my interests?

Finding ways to focus in on specific topic areas can make it easier to pick a topic, especially if it's something that you find interesting. You can also find potential article topics by performing a search on Wikipedia to see if something is covered properly or by asking your teacher for a suggestion - sometimes your professor will already have specific topics in mind for your class. You can also find articles by looking through the category sections - you can see these at the bottom of an article:

image description

You can also look for redlinks in articles or in navigation boxes - this means that the topic doesn't have an article and could possibly merit one.

It's generally recommended that you not choose a topic where the article is considered to be a good or featured article (this information can be seen on the article's talk page), as editing these can be very time consuming and difficult since the expectations for editing on that page will be much higher. It's also a good idea to avoid overly controversial topics, since those tend to be very closely monitored by other editors and it can be difficult to write something that would fit Wikipedia's guidelines. Finally, always make sure to find independent, reliable sourcing for your topic to ensure that it meets notability guidelines, if you're making a new article. If the topic doesn't meet notability guidelines then it will most likely be deleted after it's moved to the mainspace, which can be disheartening.

With so many articles on Wikipedia, it's easy to get overwhelmed and panic about picking out an article! One of the best ways to solve the issue of an overabundance of topics is to consider the following questions:

  • Is my class focusing on a specific topic?
  • What are my interests?

Finding ways to focus in on specific topic areas can make it easier to pick a topic, especially if it's something that you find interesting. You can also find potential article topics by performing a search on Wikipedia to see if something is covered properly or by asking your teacher for a suggestion - sometimes your professor will already have specific topics in mind for your class. You can also find articles by looking through the category sections - you can see these at the bottom of an article:

image description

You can also look for redlinks in articles or in navigation boxes - this means that the topic doesn't have an article and could possibly merit one.

Here is Wikipedia's article assessment scale:

image description

It's generally recommended that you not choose a topic where the article is considered to be a good or featured article (this information can be seen on the article's talk page), as editing these can be very time consuming and difficult since the expectations for editing on that page will be much higher. Instead, try to focus on Start-class or Stub-class articles. You can view a list of stub categories on Wikipedia here.

Looking for stub articles about cell biology or biographies of chemists? What about book stubs? Or history stubs?

You can find all of these categories and more by searching the Stub Category table of contents. It's alphabetical, so it should be easy to find a topic related to what you want to work on!

image description

It's also a good idea to avoid overly controversial topics, since those tend to be very closely monitored by other editors and it can be difficult to write something that would fit Wikipedia's guidelines. Finally, always make sure to find independent, reliable sourcing for your topic to ensure that it meets notability guidelines, if you're making a new article. If the topic doesn't meet notability guidelines then it will most likely be deleted after it's moved to the mainspace, which can be disheartening.

With so many articles on Wikipedia, it's easy to get overwhelmed and panic about picking out an article! One of the best ways to solve the issue of an overabundance of topics is to consider the following questions:

  • Is my class focusing on a specific topic?
  • What are my interests?

Finding ways to focus in on specific topic areas can make it easier to pick a topic, especially if it's something that you find interesting. You can also find potential article topics by performing a search on Wikipedia to see if something is covered properly or by asking your teacher for a suggestion - sometimes your professor will already have specific topics in mind for your class. You can also find articles by looking through the category sections - you can see these at the bottom of an article:

image description

You can also look for redlinks in articles or in navigation boxes - this means that the topic doesn't have an article and could possibly merit one.

Here is Wikipedia's article assessment scale: scale:

image description

It's generally recommended that you not choose a topic where the article is considered to be a good or featured article (this information can be seen on the article's talk page), as editing these can be very time consuming and difficult since the expectations for editing on that page will be much higher. Instead, try to focus on Start-class or Stub-class articles. You can view a list of stub categories on Wikipedia here.

Looking for stub articles about cell biology or biographies of chemists? What about book stubs? Or history stubs?

You can find all of these categories and more by searching the Stub Category table of contents. It's alphabetical, so it should be easy to find a topic related to what you want to work on!

image description

It's also a good idea to avoid overly controversial topics, since those tend to be very closely monitored by other editors and it can be difficult to write something that would fit Wikipedia's guidelines. Finally, always make sure to find independent, reliable sourcing for your topic to ensure that it meets notability guidelines, if you're making a new article. If the topic doesn't meet notability guidelines then it will most likely be deleted after it's moved to the mainspace, which can be disheartening.

With so many articles on Wikipedia, it's easy to get overwhelmed and panic about picking out an article! One of the best ways to solve the issue of an overabundance of topics is to consider the following questions:

  • Is my class focusing on a specific topic?
  • What are my interests?

Finding ways to focus in on specific topic areas can make it easier to pick For a topic, especially if it's something that you find interesting. You can also find potential article topics by performing more detailed walk-through, take a search on Wikipedia to see if something is covered properly or by asking your teacher for a suggestion - sometimes your professor will already have specific topics in mind for your class. You can also find articles by looking through the category sections - you can see these look at the bottom of an article:

image description

You can also look Finding Your Article training for redlinks in articles or in navigation boxes - this means that the topic doesn't have an article and could possibly merit one.

Here is Wikipedia's article assessment scale:

image description

It's generally recommended that you not choose a topic where the article is considered to be a good or featured article (this information can be seen students on the article's talk page), as editing these can be very time consuming and difficult since the expectations for editing on that page will be much higher. Instead, try to focus on Start-class or Stub-class articles. You can view a list of stub categories on Wikipedia here.

Looking for stub articles about cell biology or biographies of chemists? What about book stubs? Or history stubs?

You can find all of these categories and more by searching the Stub Category table of contents. It's alphabetical, so it should be easy to find a topic related to what you want to work on!

image description

It's also a good idea to avoid overly controversial topics, since those tend to be very closely monitored by other editors and it can be difficult to write something that would fit Wikipedia's guidelines. Finally, always make sure to find independent, reliable sourcing for your topic to ensure that it meets notability guidelines, if you're making a new article. If the topic doesn't meet notability guidelines then it will most likely be deleted after it's moved to the mainspace, which can be disheartening. Dashboard.