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This semester, we’re conducting a "pilot" study to understand the skillsets developed through Wikipedia assignments. This research will assess these students’ information literacy and research skills, alongside surveys of attitudes toward the assignment and toward Wikipedia.

Here is some more information about the research: https://wikiedu.org/blog/2016/08/29/evaluating-student-learning-through-wikipedia/

Some answers to frequently asked questions:

1. Do you have IRB (Human Subjects Review) approval? A. Yes, we have IRB approval from The University of Massachusetts Amherst.

2. Do students have to take the surveys to participate in the course? Does this affect the student's grade / work? A. No. Absolutely not. We encourage students to take these surveys, but we are very explicit that it does not count towards their grade. This is very explicit in the introduction video, as well as the consent form.

3. How much time will this take for my students? A. The research consists of pre and post-test assessments that consist of demographics questions and multiple choice questions pertaining to information literacy skills, as well as a survey with more open-ended and reflective questions pertaining to attitudes towards Wikipedia, their assignment, and perceived skills transfer. The two pre and post-course assessments take roughly 10 to 15 minutes each to complete. The open-ended survey could take as little as 10 minutes, but since it is open-ended, there is no way to know how much the student chooses to contribute.

4. I heard there will be focus groups? What will this consist of? Can I take part? A. We will email potential professors to invite their classes to participate in focus groups towards the end of the semester. The focus groups will be recorded and transcribed by the PI, Dr. Zachary McDowell, and used as part of the larger data set for this research study. Much like the post-course survey, the focus group will consist of reflective questions regarding attitudes towards Wikipedia, the Wikipedia-based assignments, and reflection on perceived skills-transfer. We hope we can conduct these focus groups without the instructor present, but this will be up to the instructor and the institution.

5. I heard you are looking for collaborators, how can I participate? A. First of all, you can help your students understand how important this research is. Secondly, after the semester has concluded, we will release the anonymized data under an open license. We encourage anyone interested in using this data to do so, and if they wish to co-author or create a panel with Zach McDowell, please contact him (zach at wikiedu dot org).

6. Can I have the data for my class? A. We cannot release confidential data for your individual students, but we will send you aggregated data from the pre and post-test assessments. Please contact Helaine or Zach after your class has completed and we will get back to you with this.

7. I heard you were offering students feedback? What is this? A. We are offering students individualized feedback based on the pre and post test assessments. They will receive this by email after the course is complete, identifying their progress on information literacy skills mapped to ACRL's Information Literacy Framework.

8. Can I see the questions? A. Sure, email Zach and he will send you the questions. We won't post them publicly at this point so that students don't have access to them immediately.

This semester, we’re conducting a "pilot" study to understand the skillsets developed through Wikipedia assignments. This research will assess these students’ information literacy and research skills, alongside surveys of attitudes toward the assignment and toward Wikipedia.

Here is some more information about the research: https://wikiedu.org/blog/2016/08/29/evaluating-student-learning-through-wikipedia/

Some answers to frequently asked questions:

1. Do you have IRB (Human Subjects Review) approval? A. Yes, we have IRB approval from The University of Massachusetts Amherst.

2. Do students have to take the surveys to participate in the course? Does this affect the student's grade / work? A. No. Absolutely not. We encourage students to take these surveys, but we are very explicit that it does not count towards their grade. This is very explicit in the introduction video, as well as the consent form.

3. How much time will this take for my students? A. The research consists of pre and post-test assessments that consist of demographics questions and multiple choice questions pertaining to information literacy skills, as well as a survey with more open-ended and reflective questions pertaining to attitudes towards Wikipedia, their assignment, and perceived skills transfer. The two pre and post-course assessments take roughly 10 to 15 minutes each to complete. The open-ended survey could take as little as 10 minutes, but since it is open-ended, there is no way to know how much the student chooses to contribute.

4. I heard there will be focus groups? What will this consist of? Can I take part? A. We will email potential professors to invite their classes to participate in focus groups towards the end of the semester. The focus groups will be recorded and transcribed by the PI, Dr. Zachary McDowell, and used as part of the larger data set for this research study. Much like the post-course survey, the focus group will consist of reflective questions regarding attitudes towards Wikipedia, the Wikipedia-based assignments, and reflection on perceived skills-transfer. We hope we can conduct these focus groups without the instructor present, but this will be up to the instructor and the institution.

5. I heard you are looking for collaborators, how can I participate? A. First of all, you can help your students understand how important this research is. Secondly, after the semester has concluded, we will release the anonymized data under an open license. We encourage anyone interested in using this data to do so, and if they wish to co-author or create a panel with Zach McDowell, please contact him (zach at wikiedu dot org).us.

6. Can I have the data for my class? A. We cannot release confidential data for your individual students, but we will send you aggregated data from the pre and post-test assessments. Please contact Helaine or Zach after your class has completed and email contact@wikiedu.org at the end of the semester we will get back to you with this.

7. I heard you were offering students feedback? What is this? A. We are offering students individualized feedback based on the pre and post test assessments. They will receive this by email after the course is complete, identifying their progress on information literacy skills mapped to ACRL's Information Literacy Framework.

8. Can I see the questions? A. Sure, email us at contact@wikiedu.org and Zach and he will send you the questions. We won't post them publicly at this point so that students don't have access to them immediately.

This semester, we’re conducting a "pilot" study to understand the skillsets developed through Wikipedia assignments. This research will assess these students’ information literacy and research skills, alongside surveys of attitudes toward the assignment and toward Wikipedia.

Here is some more information about the research: https://wikiedu.org/blog/2016/08/29/evaluating-student-learning-through-wikipedia/

Some answers to frequently asked questions:

1. Do you have IRB (Human Subjects Review) approval? A. Yes, we have IRB approval from The University of Massachusetts Amherst.

2. Do students have to take the surveys to participate in the course? Does this affect the student's grade / work? A. No. Absolutely not. We encourage students to take these surveys, but we are very explicit that it does not count towards their grade. This is very explicit in the introduction video, as well as the consent form.

3. How much time will this take for my students? A. The research consists of pre and post-test assessments that consist of demographics questions and multiple choice questions pertaining to information literacy skills, as well as a survey with more open-ended and reflective questions pertaining to attitudes towards Wikipedia, their assignment, and perceived skills transfer. The two pre and post-course assessments take roughly 10 to 15 minutes each to complete. The open-ended survey could take as little as 10 minutes, but since it is open-ended, there is no way to know how much the student chooses to contribute.

4. I heard there will be focus groups? What will this consist of? Can I take part? A. We will email potential professors to invite their classes to participate in focus groups towards the end of the semester. The focus groups will be recorded and transcribed by the PI, Dr. Zachary McDowell, and used as part of the larger data set for this research study. Much like the post-course survey, the focus group will consist of reflective questions regarding attitudes towards Wikipedia, the Wikipedia-based assignments, and reflection on perceived skills-transfer. We hope we can conduct these focus groups without the instructor present, but this will be up to the instructor and the institution.

5. I heard you are looking for collaborators, how can I participate? A. First of all, you can help your students understand how important this research is. Secondly, after the semester has concluded, we will release the anonymized data under an open license. We encourage anyone interested in using this data to do so, and if they wish to co-author or create a panel with Zach McDowell, please contact us.

6. Can I have the data for my class? A. We cannot release confidential data for your individual students, but we will send you aggregated data from the pre and post-test assessments. Please email contact@wikiedu.org at the end of the semester we will get back to you with this.

7. I heard you were offering students feedback? What is this? A. We are offering students individualized feedback based on the pre and post test assessments. They will receive this by email after the course is complete, identifying their progress on information literacy skills mapped to ACRL's Information Literacy Framework.

8. Can I see the questions? A. Sure, email us at contact@wikiedu.org and Zach will send you the questions. We won't post them publicly at this point so that students don't have access to them immediately.

9. What is this incentivizing program? How do students participate? A. Student participants in the research will be entered into drawing for $50 USD Amazon.com Gift cards. Four $50 USD Amazon gift cards will be given out randomly for every 100 participants in the research study. To enter, students must complete both the pre and post course assessments, available on the Wiki Ed Dashboard. Additionally, they may gain an "additional entry" to win (increasing their odds) by completing the post-course survey that will be made available after completion of the post-course assessment.

Cards will only be from Amazon.com and only for $50 USD. Recipients will notified and awarded their Amazon.com gift cards on January 17, 2017 via email, after the surveys close. Surveys will close on January 16th, 2017. No more than one gift card will be awarded per student entrant.